#ShowingUp with Anese Cavanaugh

You Want It, But Will You Show Up to Create It? 7 Ways Forward

I met a gentleman at the gym a few weeks ago. (Let's call him "George".) George is an entrepreneur, has a small and tight team, has celebrated some big wins and losses, made some good money, lost some good money, hit some big impact, missed some big impact, and as he trained next to me, apparently was considering his next move.

I met a gentleman at the gym a few weeks ago. (Let's call him "George".) George is an entrepreneur, has a small and tight team, has celebrated some big wins and losses, made some good money, lost some good money, hit some big impact, missed some big impact, and as he trained next to me, apparently was considering his next move.

We got to talking. (I don't know how this happens, planes, trains, gyms -- I am a magnet for conversation.)

He shared his desires for the next level; what they were, what the impact of them would be, how it would serve his team and the end-users, and then he said, "I just don't know if I have it in me to do the work it will take, or even if I want it; it feels huge and ambiguous and I'm a little tired."

I have heard this, and by the way said this, so many times that I actually almost wait for it when I witness someone on the brink of stepping into something new and big.

I believe this statement, or at least the sentiment that goes with it, is part of the very human process of growth and making big impact.

I offered this perspective, and then shared that, in my experience, just the honest full-permissioned conversation with ourselves of "Do I really want this? Why? Is it okay to not want it? Gosh darn it feels hard and I don't want to work that hard. Maybe I just want to sell chocolate..." Could often free up a ton of energy and space to see "What's really here? What do I really want? And who would I have to become to create it?"

Or not.

We talked a bit more, exchanged "good lucks/nice to meet ya's", and went on with our training.

I ran into George again last week. His energy had shifted. "Hey! I gotta tell you what I decided to do." He was pumped (since we were in gym, this is literally and figuratively).

"I'm going for it."

Apparently he'd given himself some space to allow "the grapple" with wanting it and not wanting it. He'd talked with his team. Met with a few of their key clients to run some ideas by them. Talked with himself some more. And he'd decided.

Yes. He was going for it.

As he shared his experience, his energy and body language was congruent, I believe he'll do it.

Here were some of the highlights of his process that made a "full body yes!" (and even next steps) available to him.

  • He gave himself space to grapple with it, and permission to decide NO.
  • He was honest with himself about why he wanted it (some ego, some purpose-oriented), and why he didn't (more work, he'd have to show up bigger, herding teams is sometimes like herding cats).
  • Purpose won as his motivation, so then he asked himself the question, truly and deeply, "Who would I have to become as a leader in my company, and life, to make this happen in the most easy and powerful way? What would I have to step into? What would I have to let go of?" These were jackpot questions.
  • He read an article I'd written on "setting yourself up right to get it" and integrated several of the "25 ways" into his implementation plan.
  • He had a conversation with his wife and kids and team about what would be necessary of them all, were they in it together?
  • He decided that no matter what happened, he'd look at it from an opportunity and stretch perspective, keeping the "vibe" high -- no matter what: Crappy day? Great, what do we need to do to get in front of [whatever made it crappy] in the future? How does this grow us as a team? Lost deal? Bummer, where do we need to be better? Fatigue? Awesome, I'm really "in this", I'm on purpose, AND I need a nap...
  • He got into action immediately. The minute he felt that "YES", he took the first step. And then the next. And the next. Where he was ambiguous -- he trusted intuition. Where he was wrong -- he learned and recovered. You get the idea.

And he was off. I'm looking forward to watching them go.

So, if you want it, or maybe you don't -- start there. Follow George's experience as it serves you, and even better -- create your own. The article I mentioned has gotten some great play, check that out too and see... what's up?

Have a beautiful Monday!

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